Curvature Without a Linear Vector

One latest discovery is that of finding two alternate locations, simultaneously, of a single inline linear vector. Existing between both locations is a single line, without a curve. However, from an exterior boundary of both alternate locations, an unusual curvature was measured. Until now, there has been no way of measuring any kind of curvature near the exterior vector space. The recent extrapolation and composition of particulate measurements only allows one conclusion: curvature may exist independent of alternate locations of vectors!

Although simpler methods of measurement exist, none will be as accurate as those used when doing particulate measurements. (How else can one find the aforementioned curvature?) Without digressing from the importance of such a discovery, any meaningful relationship between various vector spaces, or, extrapolation of linear measurements can only offer a circumstantial view of spatial positionings of inline linear vectors. A list of circumstantial views follows:

  • Lines with external space occupied by curves.
  • Linear boundaries without any curvature.
  • Space defined only by a curved boundary.
  • Space, undefined, without linear vectors or curves.

This list could go on and on. One may quickly realize that without any kind of spatial curvature, lines (and their linear vector-counterparts) may ultimately be random, and mixed.

Conclusion: careful, non-interpretive, and systematic positioning helps provide a system of measurement with the boundaries required to ascertain the distance between any kind of vector space when curvature is involved!

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