Posts Tagged ‘anomalies’

Empty Sky Invisible Clouds

An emptied sky consists of at least one of these three things: emptiness, invisible clouds, and technical anomalies. Emptiness could be defined as a state (or experience) of being empty. Lack of objects, flying craft, and similar moving particles could be a sign of an empty sky. Clouds sometime exist in a sky. When the sky seems empty, there may be some “invisible” clouds. To measure the distance between invisible clouds requires a special tool designed for measurement; otherwise some other functional apparatus (imagined or otherwise) may need to be used. The various technical anomalies consist of the escalation of sentient and insentient arrays of delineated forms. The anomaly exhibiting the brightest colors could be clouds that are imbued with various colors (red, blue, green, yellow, etc.), which display an aggregate of flying craft not unlike a stream with moving rocks and bark. When the rocks and bark move to and fro, the invisible clouds exhibit the technical anomaly of non-emptiness. To further clarify by way of illustration, one may wish to review the following three photos:


one of many perceived aspects

alternate perception of an aspect

Alternate perception of an aspect

a functional perception of an aspect

A functional perception of an aspect.

In the first photo, an aspect is conveyed which demonstrates a negative emptiness escalating towards an overtly emptied positive state. The negative emptiness counteracts certain effects propagated by invisible clouds. The second photo is the first photo, at a different vantage point. The third photo is unique; functional apparatuses is not only needed, but absolutely necessary to decipher the meaning of the non-existent flying craft in the photo. All three pictures bear resemblance to a photo of a wall. This has nothing to do with any technical anomalies. To define a technical anomaly, by way of using the brightest colors to delineate sentient craft above or below clouds, will almost always require the act of defining. To actively define a cloud may potentiate thoughts on the basis of water and sometimes liquified matter when such clouds consist of a liquid vapor.