Posts Tagged ‘plane’

Ascension of Polygon Consciousness

What: ascension.
Consider two or more points in a parametric field. When one of the points ascends to a vertical plane, the remaining points remain below the fundamental horizontal plane of the ascended point. If a line is stretched between those two points, a vertical (or semi-vertical) vector is formed. The simple awareness of the points, the field, the plane, and the higher point brings about “polygon consciousness,” which can only be observed after the ascension of the original point.
Why: polygons.
The aforesaid parametric field can hold more than one point, if the sum of all the points is less than weight (in grams) of the entire field. When one point ascends, the other points carry an equally opposing weight to the first point in the field. Whether the parametric field is measurable or not is of no concern to the second or third points. Therefore, polygon consciousness can only ascend when more than one vector, point, or plane descends.
How: conscious awareness.
When a falling object causes a vertically moving vector to lift (ascend), the downward moving object causes at least four points to move outward in a simple parametric field. Being conscious of the falling object in relation to the vertical vector almost always results in the complex awareness of a.) higher points, b.) opposing weights, and c.) ever-developing concern over the future measurement of both upward and downward moving objects. In the following image, there is a downward moving object with its shadow moving upward.

polygon ascension consciousness

polygon ascenscion consciousness


Although it looks like a button, one may wish to consider it as a “point” with an infinite number of surface vectors. Next to the upward-moving shadow, the ascension of the larger object (illustrated by the red diamond-shaped polygon) is apparent because its shadow is rapidly accelerating downward. Obviously, the only reason this happens is because both objects exist in the same field of consciousness, of “polygon consciousness.” Variations of the movements may be discussed in the future.

 

Arranging Infinite Circles and Squares in Space

When an infinite amount of squares, circles, and diagonal lines are gathered into a space, there will be an arrangement which becomes apparent. Suppose the given space is no larger than a sheet of paper. The squares and diagonal lines will seem to group near the center, as well as the edges. The circles, however, may appear to overlap the centermost diagonal line, forming a valley. Whether this valley is sloped, angular, or linear will depend on the quantity of diagonal lines, squares, and circles. Special attention that is given to the tangent formed where the circle touches the diagonal line always results in less-than-special attention simultaneously given to the other shapes. Conversely, if a finite amount of space is reduced, there exists the possibility that no tangent will be formed. One may wonder, “Where, and how, do triangles appear and disappear?” The answer to that is found on the edge of the space (assuming the space has more than two dimensions). Each edge cannot consist of only a linear shape; there must be triangles, squares, and diagonal lines all coexisting with the valley discussed earlier. Consider the case of two or more valleys occupying a single plane. Only subdimensional tetrahedrons will blend in nicely.

Subdimensional Tetrahedrons
Given that blue or red tetrahedrons can be grouped as parallel hedrons, it can be presumed that nonexistant tetrahedrons can only be compared to subdimensional tetrahedrons when the red and blue colors are combined, and then dissipated. When red dissipates, a pale red can remain. When blue dissipates, a violet color can consume the previously mentioned triangles (assuming they are gathered within a valley along side a tangential plane. If a red tetrahedral shape is animated in a space larger than a sheet of paper, a blue shape of the same dimension may also be animated, revealing the appearance of diagonal lines being reduced. Reduction always results in a centered point when balancing subdimensional tetrahedrons on an imagined terrestrial plane (linear or not!). The carryover from red, to blue, to triangular, to diagonal can be observed telescopically when non-linear distance needs to be maintained. Infinite amounts of diagonal lines no longer sublimate the triangular edges, red and blue tetrahedrons are no longer grouped, and edges are no longer needed when dimension ceases to exist.