Posts Tagged ‘sound’

Spectroscopic Anti-gravity Demarcation

Between any two points, there exists a random interpolation of binary queries which coexist in sub-scientific observation. The only reason such interpolation can be random is that for a binary query to sustain its existence, the initial point can be measured spectroscopically if the second point is demarcated anti-gravitically. Originally, it was thought to be a simple comparison between two elemental points. For example assume that an imaginary quantity of bismuth, carbon and bromine are compared using mass-based weight/measurement systems. Now imagine that there is no weight; no gravity, and using only anti-gravity demarcation. The results may appear to contradict previously extrapolated observation(s) when an element of randomness is interpolated non-binarily. When tertiary sound waves counterbalance the three equal measures of carbon, bromine, and random bismuth, the first elemental point becomes a spectroscopic anomaly when analyzed using thought-based conceptual comparisons. Fortunately, with the help of an attempted photo of space polarized with anti-gravity constants, these ideas may become clear. Following is a representation of an instant interpolated gravitational event:

interpolated gravity

interpolated gravity in motion

If one considers using such a photograph to think about the causal effects of systematic weight based measurements, then carbon bromine, and bismuth are no more necessary than previously imagined for said measurements. Some may take a dim stance on the conservation of energetics used at distances greater than one light year from the initial observation point, but otherworldly comparisons seem to coexist with the chance of a random interpolation.

 

Escalation, Movement, and Reversal

The escalation, movement, and reversal of calendrical time, distant space, and vacuum-space may have a coordinated basis in a phenomenon related to a particular revision theory demonstrated by the original extraterrestrial time-space thinkers. Believe me, I know this sounds quite plausible, but it would be thoughtful to use a bit of skepticism when considering such a normally empiric “revision theory” cause. Those that have learned how calendar related time can be made to collapse by repeating certain actions at ever-shortening, ever-decreasing intervals (escalation not included), have experienced first hand the immediate dimensional shift that the broadening of consciousness may provide to sentience. Various and cultured ways of considering uninhabited continents located in remote, far away, and distant isles only preclude any emphasis on the escalation and reversal of time-space, as the only appropriate and plausible consideration which remains cannot be broadened without reluctantly discerning unrelated possibilities. To collapse such time eludes the initial movement and evaluation of non-probability and delineated origins discussed in my recent ancient particle perception posting. As the secondary kinds of sounds article states, “Although the initial sound level … remains constant,” similarly, the perceptual emphasized reversal of vacuum-space, sound, and similar measurements can be related to the broadening of consciousness.

 

Improvising When Sound is Not Present

Sometimes, an initial sound isn’t present. This is of interest to a few, who are compatible with improvisation theory, not unlike particle physics. When a sound travels at, “the speed of sound,” then it is always possible for the duplicatioon of the initial sound (which cannot be improvised, all the time). Older situations are keen to notice the consiquentially improvised task of visiting the sound, in situ. Therefore, the optimum presence is determined randomly.

 

Tertiary Sound

No information is forthcoming, here, about a 3rd type of a sound.

 

Secondary Kinds of Sounds

One of the conclusions I have reached is that a secondary sound does not alter the sentient volume of an initial sound. My previous post used an example of an utterance vs a, “door slam.” Although the initial sound level (vis a vis “decibal”) remains constant, not including normal sound decay vs time, a secondary sound does mitigate the initial sound, causing the perception to be altered.  This is possibly experienced throughout the animal kingdom. Perception is directed to a sound, a secondary sound is issued (think, “striking a bell”), and then the first apperceived sound is muffled to the extent the secondary sound retains its forcefulness.