Posts Tagged ‘vector’

Curvature Without a Linear Vector

One latest discovery is that of finding two alternate locations, simultaneously, of a single inline linear vector. Existing between both locations is a single line, without a curve. However, from an exterior boundary of both alternate locations, an unusual curvature was measured. Until now, there has been no way of measuring any kind of curvature near the exterior vector space. The recent extrapolation and composition of particulate measurements only allows one conclusion: curvature may exist independent of alternate locations of vectors!

Although simpler methods of measurement exist, none will be as accurate as those used when doing particulate measurements. (How else can one find the aforementioned curvature?) Without digressing from the importance of such a discovery, any meaningful relationship between various vector spaces, or, extrapolation of linear measurements can only offer a circumstantial view of spatial positionings of inline linear vectors. A list of circumstantial views follows:

  • Lines with external space occupied by curves.
  • Linear boundaries without any curvature.
  • Space defined only by a curved boundary.
  • Space, undefined, without linear vectors or curves.

This list could go on and on. One may quickly realize that without any kind of spatial curvature, lines (and their linear vector-counterparts) may ultimately be random, and mixed.

Conclusion: careful, non-interpretive, and systematic positioning helps provide a system of measurement with the boundaries required to ascertain the distance between any kind of vector space when curvature is involved!

 

Secondary Escalation of One Dimensional Vector

It is quite difficult to capture the primary escalation of a vector for use in an infinite detector diagram. However, capturing the secondary escalation of a one-dimensional vector is easy when considering parallel conformity.

secondary escalation of one dimensional vector

When escalation is observed (as in the photo, above), less doubt is left to the imagination. In the future, an announcement may be made if additional photos are forthcoming.

 

Ancient Particle Perception

Given the eventuality of circumstances that come to pass when observing ancient particles in the daylight, the standard methods of perception prove to be, at best, a simple postulate. Arranging the reconstruction of such circumstances becomes a harsh visit to the land of non-probability, and delineated origins. If one considers that it takes exactly 186 units to travel from vector “a” to a center point, then to avail oneself of the ordinary particles (the ones previously discussed) one also has to consider the following:

    Daylight particles have less mass, when appropriate.
    Reconstructing possibilities is in the realm of probability.
    Delineated origin may trump described outlines of edges.
    Travel may sometimes consist of 186 units.
    Particle “A” and Vector “A” can commingle with a center point.

As we try to do from time to time, the appropriation of photographic descriptions may enhance the perceived topic at hand. Specifically, the photo below depicts an ancient plane on a precise vector tilt, not unlike the units needed to travel from a vector to a center point. Further study of the photo may reveal an angular shift concurrent with its position in time, space, and the particular vacuum dimension, “moving away,” in relation to a given particle.

perceived particle vector

perceived particle vector

Further illustrations may enhance the idea/construct of the perception ancient particles.